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What is the Safe Water System (SWS)?
Why was the SWS developed?
Who is the SWS for?
Where has the Safe Water System (SWS) been used?
How is a SWS started?

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Where has the Safe Water System been used?
Côte d'Ivoire


Project Partners

  • CDC
  • Projet RETRO-CI
  • Institute d'Hygiene
  • Koumassi Mother-child Clinic

Target Populations/Location

  • Urban households in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire

Project Design

  • Research project objectives:

    1. Evaluate the water quality in urban households within Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire.
    2. Evaluate if use of the SWS can provide microbiologically safe water for families with young children.
    3. Determine the feasibility of clinic-based distribution of the SWS.

    Intervention Elements

    • The CDC safe water storage vessel
    • Health education

    Project Start Date

    • Pilot study April 1999
    • First intervention March 2000

     

     

    Results of Pilot Study

    • In the pilot study, stored water was found to have lower levels of chlorine than source water (median 0.05 vs 0.2 mg/dl, p<.001). Adequate levels of free chlorine were available in municipal water supplies. Escherichia coli, a marker of fecal contamination, was detected in 36 (41%) of 87 stored water samples and 1(1%) of 108 source water samples.

    Results of First Intervention

    • In the recently completed first intervention study, vessels were distributed in the clinic without disinfectant and the quality of water in the vessels was evaluated over time. Preliminary data suggest that the addition of disinfectant to the water will be necessary to maintain adequate chlorine levels. The study team is currently evaluating the feasibility and acceptability of addition of disinfectant to the vessel. The feasibility of clinic-based distribution of the SWS with disinfectant will be determined in 2001.

    For More Information

    • [email protected]
    • [email protected]
    • Dunne et al. 2000

       

        

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