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Resources for Mother and Child Nutrition


HomeResources > Resources for Mother and Child Nutrition

In order to provide more comprehensive and meaningful search results on our site, several reports are available for viewing and download directly from this web site. Kindly visit the main sites of the author organisations for more complete and updated information. We acknowledge our gratitude to the many people and sources whose work has been drawn freely upon. We thank them all.
 


 

Mother and Child Nutrition Mission, Maharashtra



Mother-Child Nutrition Mission, Maharashtra - V Ramani
Rajmata Jijau Mother-Child Health & Nutrition Mission, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India
Presentation flash 778 kb  |  powerpoint 2.2 mb

 

 

Initiation of Breastfeeding by Breast Crawl Breast Crawl


Initiation of Breastfeeding by Breast Crawl


visit breastcrawl.org for video and complete dossier.



UNICEF, WHO and WABA along with the scientific community strongly recommend initiating breastfeeding within an hour of birth.
 
Evidence shows that early initiation can prevent 22% of all deaths among babies below one month in developing countries.

Every newborn, when placed on the mother’s abdomen, soon after birth, has the ability to find its mother’s breast all on its own and to decide when to take the first breastfeed. This is called the ‘Breast Crawl’.

This method is evidence based and has been field tested by us. A documentary on the ‘Breast Crawl’ has been prepared for training, advocacy and for wider dissemination. The video has created a very high level of sensitivity among all the levels of functionaries and was officially endorsed by senior policy makers as the right approach for initiating breastfeeding. This dossier provides the background and a scientific overview to the documentary.

Initiation of breastfeeding by the Breast Crawl is a critical component of the IYCF (Infant and Young Child Feeding) initiative for the state of Maharashtra, India. IYCF deals with nutrition of children from birth to 3 years of age, and also takes into consideration the nutrition of pregnant and lactating mothers. Two critical components of IYCF are breastfeeding and complementary feeding. Improved IYCF practices promote optimal growth and development, prevent malnutrition and improve child survival. With 40% of the children in the state undernourished, this initiative becomes extremely critical.

UNICEF has facilitated partnerships with all stakeholders including the State Government, State Nutrition Mission, the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS), Public Health Department, BPNI (Breastfeeding Promotion Network of India), NGOs, Community Based Organisations (CBOs) and several academic institutions, for this major initiative. These partnerships are aimed at creating a revolution in the state promoting IYCF practices.

We are sure that this documentary and dossier will greatly help similar initiatives worldwide. It is our strong desire that this information helps every mother and baby to experience the miracle of Breast Crawl. If we all could achieve early initiation of breastfeeding, we will be able to prevent 22% of all deaths among babies below 1 month.

This can be achieved by training all health care providers to initiate breastfeeding, by Breast Crawl, to give infants the best start in life.


visit breastcrawl.org for video and complete dossier.


 

Why is breastfeeding so important?Why Is Breastfeeding So Important?
Why Is Breastfeeding So Important?Download .pdf 17.5 mb.

Breastfeeding provides the perfect nutrition for your baby and provides many health benefits for both mother and baby.
- Initiating breast feeding within the first hour and exclusive breastfeeding can prevent under two mortality.
- Breastfeeding: Exclusive breastfeeding
- Colostrum - Gift of a protective cover from the mother
- We believe all mothers know how to feed their child. But do they?
- Myths and facts about breast milk
- Complimentary feeding
- Role of media in promoting proper young child feeding: Media should focus on and promote measures that are required to be taken urgently to ensure the survival of children


 

Diarrhoea: Why children are still dying and what can be done

Diarrhoea : Why children are still dying and what can be done

14 October, 2009 - New UNICEF/WHO Report Focuses Attention on Diarrheal Disease—the Second Leading Killer of Children Under 5—and Outlines 7-point Plan to Control This Preventable and Treatable Illness

The report highlights the proven diarrheal disease prevention and treatment solutions already available today. Many children in the developing world cannot access urgent medical care for severe illnesses, making prevention methods—including improved hygiene, sanitation, safe drinking water, exclusive breastfeeding, and vaccines preventing rotavirus—critical components of diarrheal disease control. When diarrhea occurs, it can be effectively treated with simple solutions, including oral rehydration therapy/oral rehydration solution, zinc and other micronutrients, and continued feeding.

Read more


 

Rajmata Jijau Mother-Child Health and Nutrition Mission at Aurangabad, Maharashtra Rajmata Jijau Mother-Child Health and Nutrition Mission at Aurangabad, Maharashtra

Child Development Center - NRC - Nutrition Rehabilitation Center, child tracking web based system

The State Government has decided to establish the Rajmata Jijau Mother-Child Health and Nutrition Mission at Aurangabad to tackle the grave issues of malnutrition and mortality among the children. The mission would, over a period of five years, aim at significantly reducing the incidence of severe malnutrition amongst children in 0 to 6 age group. The mission objectives stress on health and nutrition of pregnant and lactating mothers as well as special attention to children during the first year of the birth. The mission is headed by a senior officer of the rank of secretary to the State Government. The mission would undertake major publicity campaign in all towns and villages of Maharashtra to stress the importance of health and nutrition, with the ultimate aim of progressively taking over the responsibility for mother and child care.


 

Infant and Young Child Nutrition (IYCN) Project

 

The Infant and Young Child Nutrition (IYCN) Project maintains a collection of useful resources on maternal nutrition, infant and young child feeding, prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT), and more. Our collection offers a variety of high-quality training materials, publications, web links, and other helpful resources.

 

Community-based management of severe acute malnutrition

A Joint Statement by the World Health Organization, the World Food Programme, the United Nations System Standing Committee on Nutrition and the United Nations Children’s Fund

Severe acute malnutrition remains a major killer of children under five years of age. Until recently, treatment has been restricted to facility-based approaches, greatly limiting its coverage and impact. New evidence suggests, however, that large numbers of children with severe acute malnutrition can be treated in their communities without being admitted to a health facility or a therapeutic feeding centre.

The community-based approach involves timely detection of severe acute malnutrition in the community and provision of treatment for those without medical complications with ready-to-use therapeutic foods or other nutrient-dense foods at home. If properly combined with a facility-based approach for those malnourished children with medical complications and implemented on a large scale, community-based management of severe acute malnutrition could prevent the deaths of hundreds of thousands of children.

Joint statement
English 392kb | French 755kb

Press release
English | French | Spanish | Russian | Arabic | Chinese


 

Management of Severe Acute Malnutrition and Out Patient Therapeutic Program
Training Material

Ethiopia Links: Federal Ministry of Health  |  UNICEF  |  Play Therapy Africa

 

 

The WHO Child Growth Standards

India - National Workshop on Adoption of New WHO Child Growth Standards

The WHO web site presents complete information on the WHO Child Growth Standards.

These standards were developed using data collected in the WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study. The site presents documentation on how the physical growth curves and motor milestone windows of achievement were developed as well as application tools to support implementation of the standards.

 

New international Child Growth Standards for infants and young children provide evidence and guidance for the first time about how every child in the world should grow.

Documentation
The following documents describe the sample and methods used to construct the standards and present the final charts.

WHO Child Growth Standards: Methods and development
Acta Paediatrica Supplement
Chart catalogue | en espa�ol


Indicators
The following links provide access to the first and second set of the WHO child growth standards (0-60 months):

:: Length/height-for-age
:: Weight-for-age
:: Weight-for-length
:: Weight-for-height
:: Body mass index-for-age (BMI-for-age)
:: Head circumference-for-age
:: Arm circumference-for-age
:: Subscapular skinfold-for-age
:: Triceps skinfold-for-age
:: Motor development milestones


Backgrounders
 

What are the WHO Child Growth Standards?
English [pdf 65kb] | French [pdf 69kb] | Spanish [pdf 63kb]
 

What impact will the WHO Child Growth Standards have?
English [pdf 65kb] | French [pdf 67kb] | Spanish [pdf 66kb]
 

WHO Child Growth Standards and Infant and Young Child Feeding
English [pdf 57kb] | French [pdf 55kb] | Spanish [pdf 55kb]

WHO Child Growth Standards and the double burden of malnutrition
English [pdf 60kb] | French [pdf 59kb] | Spanish [pdf 59kb]

 


 

WHO Child Growth Standards - Methods and development

WHO Child Growth Standards - Methods and development
Length/height-for-age, weight-for-age, weight-for-length, weight-for-height and body mass index-for-age
WHO Child Growth Standards - Methods and developmentpdf 26.6 mb - 336 pages

In 1993 the World Health Organization (WHO) undertook a comprehensive review of the uses and interpretation of anthropometric references. The review concluded that the NCHS/WHO growth reference, which had been recommended for international use since the late 1970s, did not adequately represent early childhood growth and that new growth curves were necessary. The World Health Assembly endorsed this recommendation in 1994. In response WHO undertook the Multicentre Growth Reference Study (MGRS) between 1997 and 2003 to generate new curves for assessing the growth and development of children the world over.

The MGRS combined a longitudinal follow-up from birth to 24 months and a cross-sectional survey of children aged 18 to 71 months. Primary growth data and related information were gathered from 8440 healthy breastfed infants and young children from widely diverse ethnic backgrounds and cultural settings (Brazil, Ghana, India, Norway, Oman and USA). The MGRS is unique in that it was purposely designed to produce a standard by selecting healthy children living under conditions likely to favour the achievement of their full genetic growth potential. Furthermore, the mothers of the children selected for the construction of the standards engaged in fundamental health-promoting practices, namely breastfeeding and not smoking.


 


 

Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding

Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding
WHO - UNICEF
Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feedingpdf 440 kb - 37 pages

WHO and UNICEF jointly developed the Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding to revitalize world attention to the impact that feeding practices have on the nutritional status, growth and development, health, and thus the very survival of infants and young children.

The Global Strategy is based on the evidence of nutrition’s significance in the early months and years of life, and of the crucial role that appropriate feeding practices play in achieving optimal health outcomes. Lack of breastfeeding – and especially lack of exclusive breastfeeding during the first half-year of life – are important risk factors for infant and childhood morbidity and mortality that are only compounded by inappropriate complementary feeding. The life-long impact includes poor school performance, reduced productivity, and impaired intellectual and social development.


 


 

Management of Severe Malnutrition: A Manual for Physicians and Other Senior Health Workers

Management of Severe Malnutrition: A Manual for Physicians and Other Senior Health Workers
Management of Severe Malnutrition: A Manual for Physicians and Other Senior Health Workerspdf 1.2 mb - 68 pages

Malnutrition remains one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality among children throughout the world. Approximately 9% of children below 5 years of age suffer from wasting (weight-for-height below 22 standard deviations (,22 SD) of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)/WHO reference values) and are at risk of death or severe impairment of growth and psychological development.

This manual is based on The treatment and management of severe protein–energy malnutrition, which was published by WHO in 1981. Since then, many advances have been made in the treatment of severe malnutrition. An improved oral rehydration salts (ORS) solution has been developed for the treatment of dehydration. Advances in knowledge of the physiological roles of micronutrients have led to improved dietary management during the initial phase of treatment. It has been shown that physical and psychological stimulation, as well as care and affection, are necessary during the rehabilitation phase in order to prevent retardation of growth and psychological development.

This manual provides guidelines for the treatment of severely malnourished children (below 5 years of age) in hospitals and health centres. The treatment of severely malnourished adolescents and adults is also briefly considered. The manual is intended for health personnel working at central and district level, including physicians, nurses, midwives and auxiliaries.


 


 

Repositioning Nutrition as Central to Development

Repositioning Nutrition as Central to Development
A Strategy for Large-Scale Action - 2006
Repositioning Nutrition as Central to Developmentpdf 1.6 mb - 272 pages - original at World Bank site

Persistent malnutrition contributes not only to widespread failure to meet the first Millennium Development Goal—to halve poverty and hunger—but also to meet other goals related to maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, education, and gender equity. Underweight prevalence among children is the key indicator for measuring progress on nonincome poverty, and malnutrition remains the world’s most serious health problem—as well as the single largest contributor to child mortality. Nearly one-third of children in the developing world are underweight or stunted, and more than 30 percent of the developing world’s population suffers from micronutrient deficiencies. Moreover, new malnutrition problems are emerging: the epidemic of obesity and diet-related noncommunicable diseases is spreading to the developing world, and malnutrition is linked to the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

Repositioning Nutrition as Central to Development: A Strategy for Large-Scale Action makes the case that development partners and developing countries must increase investment in nutrition programs. This case is based on evidence that the scale of the problem is very large and that nutrition interventions are essential for speeding poverty reduction, have high benefit-cost ratios, and can improve nutrition much faster than reliance on economic growth alone. Moreover, improved nutrition can drive economic growth. The report proposes to the international development community and national governments a global strategy for accelerated action in nutrition.


 


 

Counting on Communication: The Uganda Nutrition and Early Childhood Development Project

Counting on Communication: The Uganda Nutrition and Early Childhood Development Project - 2005 - World Bank Working Paper No. 59
Counting on Communication: The Uganda Nutrition and Early Childhood Development Projectpdf 3.2 mb - 56 pages - original at World Bank site

Counting on Communication is part of the World Bank Working Paper series. These papers are published to communicate the results of the Bank’s ongoing research and to stimulate public discussion. This publication is the first in a series of Working Papers sponsored by the Development Communication Division (DevComm) of the World Bank’s External Affairs Vice-Presidency. This series is designed to share innovations and lessons learned in the application of strategic communication in development projects. Together with other donors, NGOs, and private sector partners, DevComm seeks to mainstream the discipline of development communication in development practice.

The Uganda Nutrition and Early Childhood Development Project was one of DevComm’s first projects to demonstrate the valueadded of strategic communication. The strategic communication component developed for this project included the use of formative research about values and attitudes with respect to child rearing, in order to develop and test effective messages. The communication strategy was developed in a highly participatory manner and included nurturing a team of champions for the project among policymakers, district officials, community leaders, and grassroots organizations to advocate for the project. It also included two-way communication activities developed to address the practices and behaviors that would need to be changed in order for the project to be successful, rather than merely disseminating messages based on assumptions of project benefits.

World Bank Working Papers are available individually or by subscription, both in print and online.


 


 

City Initiative for Newborn Health - Mumbai - Overview and Protocol

City Initiative for Newborn Health - Mumbai - Overview and Protocol
A Collaboration Between SNEHA, MCGM, IPU AND ICICI Bank
City Initiative for Newborn Health - Mumbai - Overview and Protocolpdf 732 kb - 34 pages

Goal

To improve the health and survival of mothers and newborn infants in underprivileged communities in Mumbai.

Purpose

To work with community members in urban slums to achieve improvements in maternal and newborn care practices and care seeking.

To work with municipal health service providers to strengthen decentralised primary care:

  • To achieve provision of high quality antenatal and postnatal care at health posts.
  • To encourage continuous quality improvement in maternal and neonatal services at maternity homes and hospitals and along the referral chain.

To test replicable and scaleable models of interventions to improve maternal and newborn health.

Methods
The initiative’s primary strategies are to encourage change through participation, self-sustaining group activities, ownership, and appreciative inquiry. The first phase of the initiative will run for 4 years. For the purposes of management and evaluation the package will be organised into three components. Within each component, strategies will be devised by groups convened to plan interventions to improve maternal and neonatal health. Intervention will take place at a number of levels, from community to tertiary.


 


 

Ranchi Low Birth Weight Project - Study Protocol

Ranchi Low Birth Weight Project - Study Protocol
Reducing Incidence of Low Birth Weight using a Community based Life Cycle Strategy

Krishi Gram Vikas Kendra, Child In Need Institute, Social Initiatives Group, ICICI Bank
Ranchi Low Birth Weight Project - Study Protocolpdf 805 kb - 16 pages

The Ranchi Low Birth Weight Project is a quasi-experimental action research study to evaluate the effectiveness of life-cycle based community level behavioural interventions in reducing the incidence of low birth weight and improving maternal and child health in Ranchi district of Jharkhand state in India.

Aims

Low birth weight (LBW) and childhood malnutrition continue to be major public health problems in India. It is well recognised that maternal and child health services as well as a range of behavioural factors need to work synergistically to break the intergenerational cycle of malnutrition and improve these key indicators which determine long term prosperity and productivity of a nation. Both on the partners' and other experiences in India and elsewhere, interventions in the Ranchi LBW project aim to improve maternal and infant health outcomes by addressing a range of medico-social and behavioural determinants of low birth weight. The study envisages implementing and evaluating the additive effects of community level behavioural interventions in bringing about positive improvements in maternal and infant health outcomes in an area where mandated public health and related services are ensured.


 


 

2006 Global Hunger Index

Wiesmann, Doris. 2006. 2006 Global Hunger Index: A Basis for Cross-Country Comparisons. Washington, DC: International Food Policy Research Institute. - October 13, 2006


The International Food Policy Research Institute has released its new Global Hunger Index, an innovative and enhanced approach for measuring hunger in developing and transitional countries. The index reveals hunger hotspots, shows which countries and regions have improved over time, and demonstrates the links between hunger and violent conflict.


 


Severe Malnutrition

List of publications
 

alt Management of severe malnutrition: a manual for physicians and other senior health workers
Geneva, World Health Organization, 1999

Chinese version under preparation. Farsi and Indonesian versions available in-country.

Cover [pdf 465kb] | English [pdf 1.46Mb] | French [pdf 878kb] | Spanish [pdf 142kb] | Portuguese [pdf 263kb] | To order a hard copy

This manual provides expert practical guidelines for the management of severely malnourished children. Addressed to doctors and other senior health workers, the manual explains exactly what must be done to save lives, achieve successful management and rehabilitation, prevent relapse, and thus give these children the greatest chance of full recovery. Throughout, the importance of treating severe malnutrition as both a medical and a social disorder is repeatedly emphasized. As successful management does not require sophisticated facilities and equipment or highly qualified personnel, the manual also performs a persuasive function, encouraging health professionals to do all they can to save these children and meet their great need for care and affection.

Recommended procedures draw on extensive practical experience as well as several recent therapeutic advances. These include improved solutions of oral rehydration salts for the treatment of dehydration, better understanding of the role of micronutrients in dietary management, and growing evidence that physical and psychological stimulation can help prevent long-term consequences of impaired growth and psychological development. Noting that the physiology of malnourished children is seriously abnormal, the manual gives particular attention to aspects of management - whether involving the interpretation of symptoms or the use of specific interventions - that differ considerably from standard procedures for well-nourished children. Details range from the reasons why IV infusion easily causes overhydration and heart failure, through a list of treatments that have no value and should never be used, to the simple reminder that underarm temperature is not a reliable guide to body temperature in a malnourished child during rewarming.

Further practical guidance is provided in eight appendices, which use numerous tables, charts, sample recording forms, instructions for preparing feeds, and examples of easily constructed toys to help ensure that management is thorough, safe, and in line with the latest knowledge.

 

Severe malnutrition: report of a consultation to review current literature
Geneva, World Health Organization, 6-7 September 2004

Cover [pdf 422kb] | Full text [pdf 364kb]

 

Guidelines for the inpatient treatment of severely malnourished children
Geneva, World Health Organization, 2003.
 

Cover [pdf 45kb] | English [pdf 400kb] | French [pdf 1.42Mb] | Spanish [pdf 687kb] | To order a hard copy

 

Training course on the management of severe malnutrition
Geneva, World Health Organization, 2002

Full course under preparation in Arabic and Dari. Flyer available in different languages.
 

English [pdf 146kb] | French [pdf 1.18Mb] | Spanish [pdf 1.18Mb] | Portuguese [pdf 1.18Mb] | Russian [pdf 235kb] | Arabic [pdf 186kb]

 

Related publications
 

Management of the child with a serious infection or severe malnutrition: Guidelines for care at first referral level in developing countries
Geneva, World Health Organization, 2000

English [pdf 2.2Mb] | French [pdf 2.3Mb] | HTML format



Pocket book of hospital care for children: Second edition Pocket book of hospital care for children: Second edition

This is a pocket-sized manual for use by doctors, senior nurses and other senior health workers who are responsible for the care of young children at the first referral level in developing countries. It presents up-to-date clinical guidelines which are based on a review of the available published evidence by subject experts, for both inpatient and outpatient care in small hospitals where basic laboratory facilities and essential drugs and inexpensive medicines are available. It focuses on the inpatient management of the major causes of childhood mortality, such as pneumonia, diarrhoea, severe malnutrition, malaria, meningitis, measles, HIV infection and related conditions. It covers neonatal problems and surgical conditions of children which can be managed in small hospitals. This pocket book is part of a series of documents and tools that support the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI).

Whereas this manual focuses on treatment recommendations, a summary of the technical background and the evidence base underlying these clinical guidelines is presented in the background book Serious childhood problems in countries with limited resources (ISBN 29 4 156269 2).

This pocket book updates and expands the guidelines contained in Management of the child with a serious infection or severe malnutrition (WHO/FCH/CAH/00.1).



Community-based management of severe malnutrition in children

In preparation for the joint WHO/SCN/UNICEF Meeting on Community-based Management of Severe Malnutrition in Children conducted in November 2005, four background papers were commissioned by the Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development and by the Department of Nutrition for Health and Development of WHO. A fifth paper was written by an NGO. These papers can be downloaded from this web page. The meeting report and the background paper are presented by a short introduction paper.

Introduction
Briend A, Prudhon C, Weise Prinzo Z, Daelmans B, Mason J. Putting back the management of severe malnutrition on the international health agenda

Full text [pdf 46kb]


Meeting report

Proceedings of the WHO, UNICEF and SCN Informal Consultation on Community-Based Management of Severe Malnutrition in Children

Full text [pdf 556kb]

Background papers

  • Myatt M, Khara T, Collins S. A review of methods to detect cases of severely malnourished children in the community for their admission into community-based therapeutic care programs
  • Ashworth A. Efficacy and effectiveness of community-based treatment of severe malnutrition
  • Collins S, Sadler K, Dent N, Khara T, GuerreroS, Myatt M, Saboya M, Walsh A. Key issues in the success of community-based management of severe malnutrition
  • Manary M. Local production and provision of ready-to-use therapeutic food for the treatment of severe childhood malnutrition
  • Gatchell V, Forsythe V, Thomas PR. The sustainability of Community-based Therapeutic Care (CTC) in non-acute emergency contexts
Transformation
Thanks to an appropriate management scheme, from being severely malnourished (weight 4.75 kg), this 2-year old girl not only gained 32% more weight in 3 weeks (weight 6.28), but she also gained an appetite for living.

1. Inpatient treatment of severe malnutrition

Severe malnutrition is defined by a very low weight for height (below -3z scores of the median WHO growth standards), by visible severe wasting, or by the presence of nutritional oedema. Decreasing child mortality and improving maternal health depend heavily on reducing malnutrition, which is responsible, directly or indirectly, for 54% of the 10.8 million deaths per year in children under five.

Although the median under-five case-fatality rate for severe malnutrition typically ranges from 30% to 50%, it can be reduced substantially when physiological and metabolic changes are taken into account. Rates have dropped below 5% in treatment centres applying a WHO-recommended scheme for managing severely malnourished children in hospital settings. In order to train health workers in applying this scheme WHO has created a course which, with the aid of institutional partners in Bangladesh, Chile, Gambia, Malawi and the UK, has been conducted in 25 countries in the African, South-East Asia and Western Pacific Regions.

:: Training courses

 

alt

2. Community-based management of severe malnutrition in children

Severe malnutrition is a life threatening condition requiring urgent treatment. Until recently, the recommendation was to refer these children to hospital to receive therapeutic diets along with medical care. The situation changed recently with the advent of ready to use therapeutic foods (RUTF) which allows the management in the community of large numbers of children who are severely malnourished without medical complications. A meeting of experts was organized by the Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development and the Department of Nutrition for Health and Development of the WHO, by UNICEF and the UN Standing committee on Nutrition in Geneva on 21-23rd November 2005 to review these recent developments and formulate recommendations. The report of this meeting is available on this web page. It is expected that implementation of these community-based interventions on a large scale along with a strengthening of referral facilities for severely malnourished children with complications could transform the lives of millions of these children.

:: Download documents

Introduction, Meeting report and Background papers

Joint Statement

Community-based management of severe acute malnutrition
A Joint Statement by the World Health Organization, the World Food Programme, the United Nations System Standing Committee on Nutrition and the United Nations Children’s Fund

Full information

Community-based management of severe acute malnutrition
English 383 KB  |  French 738 KB


SCN Nutrition Policy Paper No. 21
WHO, UNICEF, and SCN informal consultation on community-based management of severe malnutrition in children 2.041 MB


Putting back the management of severe malnutrition on the international health agenda 45 KB

Proceedings of the WHO, UNICEF and SCN Informal Consultation on community-based management of severe malnutrition in children
542 KB

A review of methods to detect cases of severely malnourished children in the community for their admission into community-based therapeutic care programs 290 KB

Efficacy and effectiveness of community-based treatment of severe malnutrition 914 KB

Key issues in the success of community-based management of severe malnutrition 434 KB

Local production and provision of ready-to-use therapeutic food for the treatment of severe childhood malnutrition 140 KB

The sustainability of Community-based Therapeutic Care (CTC) in non-acute emergency contexts 94 KB

 

 

Inpatient treatment of severe malnutrition

Training courses

 

Training Course on the Management of Severe Malnutrition in Hospitals
Kabul, Afghanistan, 8 – 19 June 2002

Full text [pdf 128kb]

Training Course on the Management of Severe Malnutrition
Banjul, The Gambia, 25 June – 5 July 2002

Full text [pdf 78kb]

Inter-Country Training Workshop on Management of Severe Malnutrition, ICDDR'B Hospital
Dhaka, Bangladesh, 11 – 22 December 2002.

Full text [pdf 95kb]

Training Course on the Management of Severe Malnutrition
Blantyre, Malawi, 24 April to 3 May 2003

Full text [pdf 36kb]

Facilitators' Training on the Management of Severe Childhood Malnutrition in Hospitals
Lusaka, Zambia, 3 – 8 August 2003.

Full text [pdf 19kb]

National Training Course on the Management of Severe Malnutrition
Livingstone, Zambia, 10-17 November 2003

Full text [pdf 54kb]

National Training Course for Improving management of Severe Malnutrition
Maseru, Lesotho, 20 November - 6 December 2003

Full text [pdf 28kb]

Inter-country Training Workshop on Management of Severe Childhood Malnutrition
National Pediatric Hospital, Phnom Penh, Cambodia, 26 November – 6 December, 2003.

Full text [pdf 212kb]

Training Course on the Management Severe Malnutrition
La Paz, Bolivia, 2-12 February 2004

Full text [pdf 215kb]

National Training Course on the Management of Severe Malnutrition
Mbabane, Swaziland, 9-21 February 2004

Full text [pdf 18kb]

Facilitator Training in the Management of Severely Malnourish Children in Hospitals
Lahore, Pakistan, 7-10 March 2005

Full text [pdf 63kb]

 


World Food Programme Presentations

ending child hunger and undernutrition initiative ending child hunger and undernutrition initiative - Copenhagen, 19 June 2006
overview of issues and moving forward
World Health Organization
Presentation flash 785 kb  |  powerpoint 2.6 mb
Ending Child Hunger in India Ending Child Hunger in India
Partnering with Local Institutions for National Advocacy
World Food Programme
World Health Organization
Presentation flash 70 kb  |  powerpoint 179 kb
Providing an 'essential package' for child survival: WFP and UNICEF in Ethiopia Providing an 'essential package' for child survival: WFP and UNICEF in Ethiopia
Government of Ethiopia - World Food Programme - UNICEF
World Health Organization
Presentation flash 100 kb  |  powerpoint 666 kb
End Child Hunger and Undernutrition Initiative in Latin America and the Caribbean End Child Hunger and Undernutrition Initiative in Latin America and the Caribbean
United in the Battle to End Child Hunger - WFP Global Meeting Copenhagen - June 2006
World Food Programme - UNICEF
World Health Organization
Presentation flash 187 kb  |  powerpoint 424 kb


 


India's Undernourished Children: A Call for Reform and Action India's Undernourished Children
A Call for Reform and Action


India's Undernourished Children: A Call for Reform and Actionpdf 3.2 mb - 116 pages - original at World Bank site

Michele Gragnolati; Caryn Bredenkamp; Meera Shekar; Monica Das Gupta; Yi-Kyoung Lee
Publisher: The World Bank
Keywords: Nutrition; Anganwadi; Health; India; Food; ICDS; Child; South Asia; Malnutrition

The prevalence of child undernutrition in India is among the highest in the world, nearly double that of Sub-Saharan Africa, with dire consequences for morbidity, mortality, productivity and economic growth. Drawing on qualitative studies and quantitative evidence from large household surveys, this book explores the dimensions of child undernutrition in India and examines the effectiveness of the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) program, India's main early child development intervention, in addressing it. Although levels of undernutrition in India declined modestly during the 1990s, the reductions lagged behind those achieved by other countries with similar economic growth. Nutritional inequalities across different states and socioeconomic and demographic groups remain large. Although the ICDS program appears to be well-designed and well-placed to address the multi-dimensional causes of malnutrition in India, several problems exist that prevent it from reaching its potential. The book concludes with a discussion of a number of concrete actions that can be taken to bridge the gap between the policy intentions of ICDS and its actual implementation.

Mother-Child Protection Card

The Mother and Child Protection Card (MCP Card) has been introduced through a collaborative effort of the Ministry of Women and Child Development and the Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India

The MCP card is a tool for informing and educating the mother and family on different aspects of maternal and child care and linking maternal and childcare into a continuum of care through the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) scheme of Ministry of Women and Child Development and the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) of the Ministry of Health & Family Welfare (MoHFW).

The card also captures some of key services delivered to the mother & baby during Antenatal, Intranatal & Post natal care for ensuring that the minimum package of services are delivered to the beneficiary.

MCP card has already been disseminated in the year 2010-11 for implementation by the States.

The MCP card helps in timely identification, referral and management of complications during pregnancy, child birth and post natal period. The card also serves as a tool for providing complete immunization to infants and children, early and exclusive breast feeding, complementary feeding and monitoring their growth.


UNICEFMother-Child Protection Card and Guide


Benefiting

  • Families / Program participants
  • Anganwadi workers of ICDS 
    - Integrated Child Development Schemes
  • Nurse midwife
  • Supervisors of health and ICDS 

This guide book is to be used as a reference book by these functionaries of health and ICDS to focus on under three. The components are

  • Safe Motherhood
  • Care of the New born
  • Child Growth and Development
  • Nutrition
  • Immunisation and
  • The Importance of the Mother Child Protection Card
English

Mother Child Protection Card
click to enlarge
English

Mother Child Protection Card Side A
Side A click to enlarge



Mother Child Protection Card Side B
Side B click to enlarge

 

Download Card
Full Size
English


Side A  pdf formatpdf 3.2 mb
Side B
 pdf formatpdf 1.8 mb

Marathi

Mother Child Protection Card
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Marathi

Mother Child Protection Card
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Mother Child Protection Card
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Download Card
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Marathi


Side A & B
pdf formatpdf 7.4 mb

Assamese
Download Assamese version in pdf format
2.7 mb

Inside Pages
Download Assamese version of Inside Pages in pdf format
9.5 mb

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Bengali
Download Bengali version in pdf format
8.5 mb

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Kannada
Download Kannada version in pdf format
4.1 mb

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Odisha
Download Odisha version in pdf format
13.8 mb

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Telugu
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3 mb

A Guide For Use of the Mother-Child Protection Card

for the community and the family, Anganwadi Worker, Auxiliary Nurse Midwife & Sector Supervisors

Guide for Mother Child Protection Card
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Download Full Guide
English

pdf formatpdf  2 mb

Download Guide
Marathi


Front Cover pdf formatpdf  176 kb
pages 1-14 pdf formatpdf  1 mb
pages 15-30 pdf formatpdf  2 mb
pages 31-43 pdf formatpdf  1.3 mb
pages 44-56 pdf formatpdf  1.7 mb
Back Cover pdf formatpdf  176 kb




Facts for LifeFacts for Life

Author: UNICEF, WHO, UNESCO, UNFPA, UNDP, UNAIDS, WFP and the World Bank
Publication date: April 2010
Languages: English French Spanish

The fourth edition of Facts for Life contains essential information that families and communities need to know to raise healthy children. This handbook provides practical advice on pregnancy, childbirth, childhood illnesses, child development and the care of children. This edition also features a new chapter on child protection. The book is intended for parents, families, health workers, teachers, youth groups, women’s groups, community organizations, government officials, employers, trade unions, media, and non-governmental and faith-based organizations.
 


 


Dr. R. K. Anand's Guide to Child Care: For pregnant mothers and parents of infants, young children, and teenagers

Dr. R. K. Anand's Guide to Child Care is for pregnant mothers and parents of infants, young children, and teenagers. A definitive guide to the parent on pregnancy and childrearing from infancy to the teenage years. Authored by one of India's foremost paediatricians and an internationally renowned authority on breastfeeding, the book combines a knowledge of traditional childrearing practices with the latest medical developments in child care.

Dr. Anand's Guide to Child Care answers questions such as:
 
  • Is there a right age to have a baby?

  • What can I do when my baby cries?

  • Can a working mother successfully breastfeed?

  • How helpful is a joint family in bringing up children?

  • How should we handle our fussy eater?

  • Is my child ready for toilet-training?

  • Are vaccines safe?

  • When is the right age for sex education?

  • How can I raise a happy child?

  • Are drugs overprescribed for childhood illnesses?

  • How should we handle our teenager?

  • What should I do in a medical emergency?


 


The Management of Diarrhoea and Use of Oral Rehydration Therapy
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The Management of Diarrhoea and Use of Oral Rehydration Therapy - Second Edition - A Joint WHO/UNICEF Statement

Audience:

prepared by WHO/UNICEF
1992

30 pages - The Management of Diarrhoea and Use of Oral Rehydration Therapy in pdf formatpdf 626 kb

India

National Guidelines on Infant and Young Child Feeding - Aug 2004
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National Guidelines on Infant and Young Child Feeding

Audience:

Ministry of Human Resource Development, Department of Women and Child Development, Food and Nutrition Board, Government of India
August 2004

37 pages - National Guidelines on Infant and Young Child Feeding - Aug 2004 in pdf formatpdf 936 kb


 


National Guidelines on Infant Feeding
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National Guidelines on Infant Feeding

Audience:

Food and Nutrition Board, Department of Women and Child Development, Ministry of Human Resources Development, Government of India.
1992

17 pages - National Guidelines on Infant Feeding in pdf formatpdf 2.5 mb


 


Training of Doctors on Nutritional Care During Diarrhoea
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Training of Doctors on Nutritional Care During Diarrhoea

Audience:

National Diarrhoeal Diseases Control & O.R.T. Programmes
Government of India, Directorate General of Health Services, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, New Delhi, India
prepared by the National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases (ICMR) Calcutta, India

15 pages - Training of Doctors on Nutritional Care During Diarrhoea in pdf formatpdf 780 kb


 


Policy on Control of Nutritional Anaemia
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Policy on Control of Nutritional Anaemia

Audience:

Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India
January 1991

11 pages - Policy on Control of Nutritional Anaemia in pdf formatpdf 1.7 mb


 


Prevention and Control of Nutritional Anaemia: A South Asia Priority
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Prevention and Control of Nutritional Anaemia: A South Asia Priority

Audience:

United Nations Children's Fund - Regional Office for South Asia - 2002

16 pages - Prevention and Control of Nutritional Anaemia: A South Asia Priority in pdf formatpdf 2 mb


 


Preventing and Controlling Iron Deficiency Anaemia Through Primary Health Care
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Preventing and Controlling Iron Deficiency Anaemia Through Primary Health Care

Audience: A Guide for Health Administrators and Programme Managers

E. M. DeMaeyer
Formerly Medical Officer, Nutrition, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland
with the collaboration of P. Dallman, J. M. Gurney, L. Hallberg, S. K. Sood & S. G. Srikantia
1989

61 pages - Preventing and Controlling Iron Deficiency Anaemia Through Primary Health Care in pdf formatpdf 1.7 mb


 


Better Care During Diarrhoea
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Better Care During Diarrhoea

32 pages  - Understanding and Managing Acute Diarrhoea in Infants and Young Children in pdf formatpdf 4.1 mb


 


Diarrhoea - Green Guide 3
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Diarrhoea - Guide 3

Audience:

Govt. of India, Central Health Education Bureau, Ministry of health and Family Welfare
May 1984

8 pages - Diarrhoea Guide in pdf formatpdf 2.5 mb


 


Marathi Cookbook - Iron and Vitamin C Rich Recipes - Gharchya Ghari Anaemia Tala
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Marathi Cookbook
Iron and Vitamin C Rich Recipes
Gharchya Ghari Anaemia Tala


Audience:

June 2002

67 pages - Marathi Cookbook - Iron and Vitamin C Rich Recipes - Gharchya Ghari Anaemia Tala in pdf formatpdf 2.8 mb


 


Management of Critically Sick Child
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Management of Critically Sick Child

Audience:

Directorate of Health Services Maharashtra State
Department of Paediatrics, Cama & Albless Hospital, Mumbai
Maharashtra State Health Education Bureau, Aundh, Pune
1997-1998

41 pages - Management of Crticially Sick Child in pdf formatpdf 9.5 mb


 


Maharashtra - Guide
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Maharashtra - Guide

Audience:

26 pages - Maharashtra in pdf formatpdf 879 kb

 


Vitamin A

Vitamin A: Frequently Asked Questions - English
Vitamin A: Frequently Asked Questions - Marathi -  Vitamin A FAQs in Marathi - pdf formatpdf 49 kb

Vitamin A Marathi brochure -  Vitamin A Marathi brochure in pdf formatpdf 470 kb

 

Vitamin A Marathi brochure - front
Front - download 219 kb
Vitamin A Marathi brochure - back
Back - download 274 kb



The great Vitamin A fiasco - World Nutrition - May 2010
Michael Latham

This commentary challenges the wisdom and validity of the current practice of providing to children between 6 months and 5 years, regular supplements of massive medicinal doses of vitamin A. Every year, roughly half a billion capsules are made to be distributed and to be given to around 200 million children in over 100 ‘targeted’ countries (1,2). One standard method of dosing of younger children is shown in the picture above, which appears on the cover of a United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) working paper issued in 2005 (1). In most cases, this medicinal dosing is now being done in countries and areas where the vitamin A deficiency diseases xerophthalmia and blinding keratomalacia are now rare, and any clinical signs of vitamin A deficiency are now uncommon. download pdfpdf442 kb

Vitamin A saves lives. Sound science, sound policy
Keith P West Jr, Rolf DW Klemm, Alfred Sommer
 
Vitamin A deficiency can cause blindness, impair health, and be an underlying cause of death, in young children. Therefore, responsible debate about its public health importance, and the value of prevention, should be based on reliable evidence of the extent and severity of deficiency, and on the impact of interventions. download pdfpdf 315 kb

Universal Vitamin A Supplementation Programme in India: The need for a re-look  download pdfpdf 37 kb
The National Medical Journal of India - Vol. 23, No. 5, October 2010

20 Million US Dollars on Vitamin A Procurement : Out of 32 Million US Dollars of Annual Budget 2009-2010
The Indian scientists have raised their concern on over emphasis of Vitamin A supplementation to children. The recent research communications from Prof. Michael Latham and Prof. C. Gopalan have raised this issue with scientific evidence. These excerpts from the Annual Report of Micronutrients Initiatives India an International Non Government Organization, according to which out of 32 Million US Dollar available in the Annual Budget 2009-2010, more than 20 Million US Dollars were spent on Vitamin A Procurement and Interventions. A meager sum of 2.5 Million US Dollars were spent on Iron interventions.

Anaemia is most common nutritional deficiency disorders in the country. Almost vulnerable age groups have anaemia in the range of 60-90%. The health consequences of anaemia are highly detrimental to Maternal and Child Health. The prevalence of Vitamin A deficiency is less than one percent and is limited to selected geographical pockets in the country. The Keratomalacia and Nutritional Blindness have disappeared.

It is unfortunate but true that the agencies are trying to implement interventions for prevention and control of micronutrients disorders according to their mandate rather than the magnitude and health consequences.

 


Off-site links


Free Downloads from Hesperian

Hesperian Home > Books and Resources

Hesperian Health Guides are easy to use, medically accurate, and richly illustrated. We publish 20 titles, spanning women’s health, children, disabilities, dentistry, health education, HIV, and environmental health, and distribute many others. Buy, download, or read from this page, or view resources by language to explore materials in Spanish and over 80 other languages.

 

Where There Is No Doctor

The most widely-used health care manual for health workers, educators, and others involved in primary health care delivery and health promotion programs around the world. Our current edition contains updated information on malaria, HIV, and more.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ IN eREADER
 

Where Women Have No Doctor

An essential resource for any woman or health worker who wants to improve her health and the health of her community, and for anyone to learn about problems that affect women differently from men. Topics include reproductive health, concerns of girls and older women, violence, mental health, and more.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ ONLINE   |   READ IN eREADER
 

A Community Guide to Environmental Health

This guide contains information, activities, stories, and instructions for simple technologies that help health promoters, environmental activists, and community leaders take charge of their environmental health.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ IN eREADER
 

Advance Chapters from the NEW Where There Is No Doctor

Topics include care for newborns, breastfeeding, and nutrition. These are the first chapters completed of an all new, 21st-century edition of our hallmark publication.

DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ ONLINE
 

A Book for Midwives

A vital resource for practicing midwives and midwifery training programs around the world, this book covers the essentials of care before, during, and after birth. It has been updated to reflect new WHO/UNICEF guidelines and standards for mothers and newborns.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ IN eREADER
 

Where There Is No Dentist

This basic dental manual uses straightforward language and step-by-step instructions to discuss preventive care of teeth and gums, diagnosing and treating common dental problems, and includes a special chapter on oral health and HIV.

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Helping Health Workers Learn

An indispensable resource for health educators, this book shows – with hundreds of methods, aids and learning strategies – how to make health education engaging and effective, and how to encourage community involvement through participatory education.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ IN eREADER
 

Disabled Village Children

This manual contains a wealth of clear and detailed information along with easy-to-implement strategies for all who are concerned about the well being of children with disabilities, especially those living in communities with limited resources.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ IN eREADER
 

A Health Handbook for Women with Disabilities

Developed with the participation of women with disabilities in 42 countries, this guide helps women to overcome the barriers of social stigma and inadequate care to improve their general health, self-esteem, and independence as active members of their communities.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ IN eREADER
 

Helping Children Who Are Deaf

This groundbreaking book, packed with activities on how to foster language learning through both sign and oral approaches, supports parents and other caregivers in building the communication skills of babies and young children.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ IN eREADER
 

Helping Children Who Are Blind

The simple and engaging activities in this book can help parents, caregivers, teachers, health workers, rehabilitation workers, and others help a child with vision problems develop all of his or her capabilities.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ IN eREADER
 

HIV, Health and Your Community

A thorough, easy-to-understand guide for health workers confronting the HIV pandemic in their communities, it covers topics from biology of the virus to epidemiology to the mechanics of designing prevention programs, using language that is accessible to those with little medical training.

BUY
 

Pesticides Are Poison

This chapter from A Community Guide to Environmental Health, available as a 36-page booklet, offers information and activities to help reduce harm caused by pesticides, to treat people in pesticide emergencies, and to understand legal and political issues related to pesticide use.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF
 

Sanitation and Cleanliness

This chapter from A Community Guide to Environmental Health, available as a 48-page booklet, offers basic information on toilet building as well as learning activities to help communities understand and prevent sanitation-related health problems.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF
 

Water for Life

This chapter from A Community Guide to Environmental Health, available as a 48-page booklet, helps communities improve drinking water sources, treat water to make it safe for drinking, and organize water projects to protect access to clean water.

DOWNLOAD PDF
 

Advance Chapters from A Workers Guide to Health and Safety

Topics include work hazards and solutions in garment industries, social hazards and solutions in garment, electronics, and shoe industries, and activities for organizing worker-led campaigns. These chapters will be part of the upcoming publication, due to be released in 2012.

DOWNLOAD PDF
 

Also available: Hesperian books in Spanish, on CD, and books from other publishers

By visiting our bookstore, you can view and buy Hesperian titles in Spanish, on CD, and books from other publishers.
 

 


WHO Resources
 

Nutrition for Health and Development (NHD)

Reproductive Health and Research (RHR

UNAIDS

 

General

Planning

Guidelines and Training

Monitoring and Evaluation

Research



Other Resources

FAO - Download Assessment of the double burden of malnutrition in six case study countries in pdf formatpdf, zipped, 2.1 mb

Asia: India: Education. Nationmaster. 26 Aug. 2005. Wikipedia Encyclopedia. 30 Aug. 2005

Bridging The Nutritional Divide. Swaminathan, M.S. The Little Magazine. 17th International Congress on Nutrition, Vienna, August 2001.

India Child Malnutrition Deaths. Chadha, Monica. BBC News, Mumbai. 27 Aug. 2005

Chronic Hunger and the Status of Women in India. Coonrod, S. Carol. The Hunger Project. 8 Aug. 2005

Demographics of India. Nationmaster. 26 Aug. 2005. Wikipedia Encyclopedia. 30 Aug. 2005

Detailed Facts and Statistics about India. Phrasebase. 2005. Phasebase. 26 June, 2005

Hunger Amidst Plenty. Dreze, Jean. India Together. Dec. 2003. Humanscape. 25 June 2005

Early Years. UNICEF. 6 Aug. 2005

Chronic Hunger and Obesity Epidemic. Gardner, Gary. Worldwatch Organization. 2 Aug. 2005

The Asian Diet Pyramid. Gifford, K. Oldways. Oldways Preservation & Exchange Trust. 20 June 2005

India has an Enormous Under-Nutrition and Over-Nutrition Problems. Haddad, Dr. Lawrence. 29 June, 2005

India: Latest. UNICEF. 30 June 2005

Child Malnutrition: Myths and Solutions. Kumar, A.K. Shiva. The Little Magazine. UNICEF. 27 June 2005

Child Nutrition in India. Mishra, Vinod. East-West Center. National Family Health Survey Subjects Reports. 30 June 2005

Food Fight For Hunger. Prasenjit Maiti. Council for Development Studies. 4 Aug. 2005

Family Life: India. Rajani, Chetan. The Settlement Organization. Cultural Profiles Project. 30 June 2005

SC Rules on Preventing Starvation Deaths. India Together. Right to Food litigation. 27 Aug. 2005

The Plight of Children in India. Statesman. Food Relief. Bhaktivedanta International Charities. 15 Aug. 2005.

Women’s Education Can Improve Child Nutrition in India. National Family Health Survey Bulletin. Feb. 2000. International Institute for Population Sciences Mumbai.

World Hunger Awareness

Global Database on Child Growth & Malnutrition (FAO)

Food Security Statistics (FAO)

Information on Vegetarian & Vegan Diets (PCRM)

Malnutrition Matters

Malnutrition (WikiPedia)

Malnutrition (WHO)

Nutrition Publications (WHO)

Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM)

Repositioning Nutrition as Central to Development: A Strategy for Large Scale Action (World Bank)

UN Millennium Development Goals

Women - The key to ending hunger (The Hunger Project)

World Hunger Map: [Asia] [Latin America & Caribbean] [Middle East, Central Asia, Eastern Europe] [West Africa] [Southern Africa] [East & Central Africa]


 


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